Published on:

Although Required Under New Jersey Workers Compensation Act to Provide An Employee With Medical Treatment For A Work Injury, An Employer Is Not Required Under New Jersey’s Law Against Discrimination to Provide Such Treatment As A Means of Reasonably Accommodating A Claimed Disability Resulting From the Work Injury

The exclusive remedy for a worker injured on the job is to pursue workers compensation benefits under New Jersey’s Workers Compensation Act (WCA) in the form of authorized medical treatment, temporary disability benefits and a partial permanency award to the extent applicable.[1]  Relatedly, New Jersey’s Law Against Discrimination (LAD) requires an employer to reasonably accommodate an employee’s disability.  N.J.A.C., 13:13-2.5; Potente v. County of Hudson, 187 N.J. 103, 110 (2006). Given this intersection of the WCA and the LAD, our New Jersey Supreme Court in Caraballo v.  Jersey City Police Dep’t, 237 N.J. 255 (2019) was called on in a case of first impression to determine whether an employee seeking to have his employer cover his double knee replacement surgery after suffering a serious work-related injury could pursue a failure to accommodate disability discrimination case under the LAD. The Court answered that the employee could not.

Looking to federal courts interpretation of the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) for guidance, the Court in Caraballo noted that that neither the text of the ADA nor its regulations “contemplate that an employer should be required to provide a disabled employee with medical treatment in order to restore her ability to perform essential job functions.”  Caraballo, 237 N.J. at 270 quoting Desmond v. Yale-New Haven Hosp., Inc., 738 F.Supp. 2d 331, 350 (D. Conn. 2010). Likewise, the Caraballo Court looked at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s compliance manual, which states that “an employer has no responsibility to monitor an employee’s medical treatment or ensure that s/he is receiving appropriate treatment because such treatment does not involve modifying workplace barriers.” Caraballo, 237 N.J. at 269; Desmond, 738 F. Supp. 2d. at 350 quoting EEOC Enforcement Guidance: Reasonable Accommodation and Undue Hardship Under the Americans with Disabilities Act, EEOC Compliance Manual § 92, No. 915.002 (Oct. 17, 2002).  Accordingly, the Caraballo Court held that the double knee replacement surgery sought by Plaintiff Caraballo was neither a modification to the work environment nor a removal of workplace barriers. Rather, “it was a means to treat or mitigate the effects of his injuries, like the treatments at issue in Desmond. We therefore find it consistent with the LAD, the ADA, and their regulations that Caraballo’s total knee replacement surgery cannot qualify as a reasonable accommodation under the LAD.” 237 N.J. at 271.

In ruling against Caraballo, the Court took note of the fact that although Caraballo requested his employer to provide him with double knee replacement surgery, he never used the enforcement mechanism of filing a petition in the workers compensation court to seek entry of an order compelling the employer and its insurer to provide him the surgery. Specifically, he refused to comply with his employer’s requests to see doctors that could “determine unequivocally whether or not he could have surgery.” 237 N.J. at 260.  When the employer’s chosen doctor authorized Caraballo’s knee surgery and told him to schedule a surgery date, he never called. Id. at 261. Even though Caraballo contacted his employer’ “several times to obtain authorization for double knee replacement surgery [he] never sought to enforce his right to the surgery in the workers’ compensation court.” Id.  at 258. Each time he disagreed with what was offered by his employer or refused to comply with their requirements to receive treatment, he failed to file a complaint with the workers’ compensation court. Therefore, regardless of the Court’s ruling that an employer was under no obligation under the LAD to reasonably accommodate a worker by providing him or her with medical treatment, Caraballo’s failure under the WCA to compel the surgery was fatal to his LAD claim. 237 N.J. at 266.

At Mashel Law LLC, we are well experienced in handling disability and injury claims. If you have been injured at the workplace, call the attorneys at Mashel Law (732) 536-6161 or fill out the contact form on this page for immediate help. At Mashel Law, LLC, located in Marlboro, New Jersey, we are dedicated to protecting the rights of employees.

[1] However, the statutory exclusivity provision or so-called “workers compensation bar” can be overcome and a worker can sue in court and seek a jury trial if they can show they were victim of an intentional wrong. Laidlow v. Hariton Mach. Co., Inc., 170 N.J. 602, 611 (2002).